11 February 2010

Bukhari Restaurant

BANGLADESH
PAKISTAN

I actually went here in search of the pizza, blogged about last year on Eating in Translation. Walking in and seeing the spread, it was obvious that the pizza was a relic of the past, but we asked anyways, to no avail. It seems like they have shifted their energies to sweets, with a big sign hanging from the awning outside and stacks of boxes within the interior all donning the brand "Bukhari Sweets." When our naan (below) came out though, it was obvious that the crust of the pizza lived on through the crispy, round bread.


Every table gets a simple salad to accompany their meal.

Before our main meals arrived from the back, we enjoyed Bollywood videos on a television above the steam table, and chatted up the proprietor who was from Bangladesh, as seems to be the case with many restaurants advertising the trifecta of Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi food. A good deal of the menu seems devoted to what we might consider to be Pakistani, but in reality the three countries share so many of the same dishes and names that advertising all of them is not a ridiculous stretch. Either way, there was a good deal of taxis parked in front and the place seemed very popular with people from all three.

Our steam table options first covered the chicken jalfarazi ($5, below), a dish with green chilies as its main component. The thick sauce also was laced with onions and pepper, and created a very nice consistency when heaped over rice and brought to us. Also in the photo were a samosa and aloo pie, both of which were tasty but not mind-blowing.


Also ordered was the lamb with squash curry ($5, below), another dish piled over rice and served. The squash was nice in the way it held its form through cooking and was not so soft yet, while the lamb and curry did what was expected of them. It didn't hold the bite like the jalfarazi, and probably should be eaten beforehand if you want to taste it.


Wanting something sweet to take home, we grabbed a package of one of the Bukhari Sweets called fenia and brought it to the table. This inspired the owner to tell us how to prepare dish with milk and sugar, and later turned into him doing it for us, despite our full stomachs. The result (below) was a very pretty bowl topped with a bit of pistachio and served with a healthy amount of sugar ready to be spooned on. It turned out that we needed a lot of the sugar to get the right spark out of the dish, which had not taken the consistency of oatmeal. We both enjoyed it though, and decided it would make an excellent breakfast.


As always, nothing from a steam table restaurant is going to make you cry with joy, but our food was very nice, and a trip or two to Bukhari is well worth any time it takes you as the place is very friendly and full of character.
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